New Empire: ‘Fallen Soldiers’ Single Review

Tooth & Nail Records
Tooth & Nail Records

Aussie quartet New Empire has the world at their feet. After the success of the 2008 release Come With Me Tonight, the Sydney-based alternative-rock outfit went on to support acts like Switchfoot and Owl City while headlining at various music festivals. Stepping into 2014, and the boys released the crowd funded In A Breath – their third album and strongest work to date. Signing onto acclaimed label Tooth and Nail Records around the same time, New Empire look to be onto something big. Their songs are poignant and electrifying, their lyrics poetic, and their chemistry is as strong as ever. Following on from the single, “Say It Like You Mean It,” they have dropped “Fallen Soldiers,” an impressive and pivotal anthem that highlights the transition the band are in as they become internationally recognized.

Opening immediately with a strong guitar line, the first verse pulls you into the battle anthem that is “Fallen Soldiers.” With a driving drum line characteristic of drummer Kale Kneale, we are lifted into a hypnotizing melody that continually climaxes on the chorus. Lead vocalist Jeremy Fowler calmly draws listeners in with his pure and distinctive vocals, and through the verses, they are left solitary with the backing of selective instrumentation.

Jumping into the chorus we are given a catchy and symbolic melody that will stay in your head long after the song is over. Singing, “We are the fallen soldiers, we’re coming back from war… And we are the broken victors, we’re born of a broken home. To silence the guns forever,” the vocals become fuller as the band carries the melody in unison. The decision to create this deeper sound contributes to the delivery of the lyrics and ultimately defines the song as an empowering anthem as opposed to a cheesy, feel good track.

With an incredible guitar line going into the bridge and just the right balance of light and shade as they drop back to the final verse, this song deposits something within you that is both powerful and hopeful. Like their peers Switchfoot, New Empire has the well-crafted ability to deliver a message and a melody that is equally moving and pivotal.

New Empire’s “Fallen Soldiers” is a rare gem within the music industry. It manages to maintain an utterly authentic and positive message, while delivering it in an inspiring and motivating way. Their third single from In A Breath is Aussie music at its best, and it shows us that there will be even bigger things for this Cronulla-based band in the future.

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