Boris Grim and Bratya Grim: ‘Dead Season’ Single Review

Courtesy of Boris Grim & Bratya Grim
Courtesy of Boris Grim & Bratya Grim

With their recent departure from singing in their native Russian language, Boris Grim and Bratya Grim have recently released their new English track, “Dead Season.” The track is an oddly dark and uneasy song that keeps you on edge throughout. It’s a surprising release, given their past, more direct and standard 90s rock jams. Also, it’s a much different song than their other English-singing track, “The Other Half of My Soul,” which was almost too-sweat and sentimental. “Dead Season,” however, carries an incredible weight with it as it dips into two distinct and separate parts.

Opening the track is Boris Burdaev, the lead vocalist, as he plucks his guitar alongside the guitarist, Vladimir Kosorukov. Burdaev’s vocals sound like their coming from an old tape recorder, as Vasily Nikitin light-drum tapping helps create an eerie and unexpected mood. Burdaev’s lyrics reference ultra-incredible secrets, leaky faucets, sinning, and the Bible, as if the lyrics themselves are as dark and twisted as the music that accompanies them.

At one point, Burdaev sings, “Don’t think what is right / And never feel sorry.” In a sense, his lyrics and the way he utters them sounds like he’s coming from either a very gloomy place or he’s under a hypnosis state. Either way, Boris Grim and Bratya Grim have an approach that slowly scratches at you until they’re under your skin.

As the first half of the song ends with Burdaev repeatedly singing “close your eyes for a while and you’ll see,” until the drums pick up tempo and the guitars build to a culminating and overpowering combination. The rest of the song feels like the ending of an Explosions in the Sky track, equipped with atmospherical sounds and incredible tension. Burdaev even lends his piano playing during the second half, and even though there are no lyrics, they all harmonize like a small, hauntingly beautiful choir.

Although I do wish the two halves of “Dead Season” felt a little more tied together and as one single unit, Boris Grim and Bratya Grim deliver one of their first great English tracks that carries a sense of who they truly are and where they are going sonically. It’s a bold, warped, and menacing track that lingers with you, even after the music has stopped.

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